New research reveals the cost-effectiveness of pediatric preparedness in emergency departments

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Components and total annual hospital costs of emergency departments (EDs) with high pediatric preparedness per pediatric ED volume. Credit: Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open (2024). DOI: 10.1002/emp2.13179

A study published in the Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open shows that adhering to national guidelines for pediatric care in emergency departments not only saves children’s lives but is also cost-effective, ranging from $4 to $48 per patient. This research, conducted by Dr. Marianne Gausche-Hill of the Lundquist Institute for Biomedical Innovation at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (TLI), provides compelling evidence on the financial feasibility of being “pediatric ready.”

The study highlights previous research showing that good pediatric care can reduce infant mortality by as much as 76%. The findings draw a significant comparison, noting that the cost is significantly lower than the average price of $65 for a single vaccine dose through the CDC’s childhood vaccination program.

Dr. Gausche-Hill, MD, FACEP, FAAP, co-first author, emergency physician at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and TLI Interim CEO, emphasized the importance of these results: “This study confirms what we have observed over the years to improve pediatric preparedness not only saves lives, but is an achievable goal for every emergency department, regardless of their size or resources. It is a worthwhile investment.”

Kate Remick, MD, lead author and co-director of the National Pediatric Readiness Project along with Dr. Gausche-Hill, amplified the message: “Our research underscores the critical need to prioritize pediatric care capabilities in emergency situations. The minimal costs are negligible compared to the substantial improvements in survival rates.”

Emergency departments looking to improve their pediatric care capabilities are encouraged to participate in the National Pediatric Readiness Project (NPRP), which offers resources and an open assessment tool on its website. To learn more about how to prepare for children and access the assessment tools, visit NPRP.

More information:
Katherine E. Remick et al., The Hospital Costs of High Pediatric Emergency Department Preparedness, Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open (2024). DOI: 10.1002/emp2.13179

Provided by the Lundquist Institute

Quote: New study reveals cost-effectiveness of pediatric preparedness in emergency departments (2024, June 11), retrieved June 11, 2024 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2024-06-reveals-effectiveness-pediatric-readiness-emergency.html

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